Category Archives: Bee Healthy

BEE Healthy Tip – What to do if you get the flu

Your December Bee Healthy Tip from the trusted team at Metropolis Drugs II:  from left: Tim Lawson, Dacia Stewart, Leslie Lawson and Lauren Scott.

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What To Do If You Get The Flu

I’m guessing that the flu isn’t on your top-10 wish list, right? But just in case you get sick this flu season, here’s a list of 10 things you can do to help ease your symptoms—and to stop the flu in its tracks and protect others.

  1. Stock up. A few supplies may make it a bit easier to manage the flu. It’s best to have these on hand before you get sick. Otherwise, send a healthy member of your family out on an errand, if you can.
    • Acetaminophen, ibuprofen, or naproxen for reducing fevers and easing achiness
    • A thermometer
    • Cough syrup or cough drops
    • Saline nose drops or sprays
    • Drinks such as fruit juices or tea (avoid caffeine)
    • Easy-to-eat foods such as clear soups, crackers, or applesauce[1,2]
  2.  Stay home! The first day you have symptoms, you may be tempted to venture out to work or school. Please don’t! Not only do you need the rest, but this is also when you’re most contagious.[1] Try to nap—and read or binge-watch your favorite television episodes.
  3. Prevent the spread In addition to staying home, wash your hands often and cover your cough and sneeze into your sleeve.[2]
  4. Drink fluids, breathe steam. This is a great way to thin your mucus, making it easier to cough up. This may help prevent a lung infection. Using a humidifier (a cool mist) or breathing in steam from a hot shower may also help ease congestion.[1]
  5. Calm your cough. It can be exhausting, I know. Try over-the-counter (OTC) cough medicines—an expectorant helps thin mucus. Do not give a child under age 4 any type of cough medicine. Sucking on lozenges may also help your cough or scratchy throat.[1]
  6. Ease nose woes. You—or your kids—can try saline nose drops or sprays to ease nasal congestion. First, put a few drops into one nostril. Then gently blow the mucus and saline out. Repeat on the other side.[1]
  7. Treat other symptoms. Sure, a fever—along with chills and achiness—is a sign your body is fighting off the virus. But that doesn’t mean you need to suffer in silence. Ask me if you have any questions about which fever reducer to take. But don’t forget: Never give aspirin to someone younger than 19—it can lead to a serious illness.[1]
  8. Ask about antivirals. Your health care provider may advise you to take one. If you do this within 48 hours of when symptoms begin, you have a fighting chance of reducing their impact.[1,2]
  9. Know when to seek medical help. If you or a loved one has any of these symptoms, call the doctor:
    • Dark urine
    • Dizziness
    • Fever of 100 degrees F for 3 or more days
    • Returning fever or sore throat after feeling better
    More serious symptoms require immediate medical care:
    • Wheezing or shortness of breath
    • Coughing up blood
    • Chest pain or pressure
    • Balance problems or confusion[2]
  10. Talk to us here at Metropolis Drugs II. And of course it goes without saying: If you need guidance about any products—or any questions whatsoever—let us know, and we’ll try to steer you in the right direction.

Nothing herein constitutes medical advice, diagnosis or treatment, or is a substitute for professional advice.  You should always seek the advice of your physician or other medical professional if you have questions or concerns about a medical condition.

Sources:

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1201 W. 10th St.   618-524-8400
Open Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Saturday, 8:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

 Visit our website for lots of resources

to help keep you and your family healthy!

BEE Healthy Tip – A Healthy Reason to Love Your Dog

Your November Bee Healthy Tip from the trusted team at Metropolis Drugs II: from left: Tim Lawson, Dacia Stewart, Leslie Lawson, and Lauren Scott.

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A Healthy Reason to Love Your Dog
Dogs may reduce childhood asthma and eczema risk

(RxWiki News) Your dog may benefit your child’s health, according to two new studies.

One new study found that babies whose mothers had a dog while pregnant may have increased protection from allergic eczema. The other new study found that children who are regularly exposed to dogs may see a decreased risk of asthma.

The authors of one of these new studies pointed out that eczema is common in infants but can lead to asthma and food and nasal allergies. Eczema is marked by red, itchy rashes.

Mothers who were exposed to a dog indoors for at least an hour a day while they were pregnant were likely to give birth to babies with a lowered risk of eczema, one study found. However, this lowered risk appeared to fade at age 10.

The second study found that dogs may carry certain elements, such as bacteria, that protect children from asthma. However, the protein that causes allergic reactions to dogs may cause asthma symptoms in children with a dog allergy.

The authors of this study pointed out that children who are allergic to dogs should not be exposed to dogs. They did not identify the specific elements dogs carry that might protect non-allergic children from asthma.

To reduce dog allergens in your home, experts recommend bathing your dog at least once a week, washing your hands after petting the dog, restricting the dog’s access to a few rooms in your home, and using air filters and vacuum cleaners regularly.

If you are concerned about your child’s risk for eczema, asthma or allergies, talk to your child’s pediatrician. And when you need help finding the right medications for your children, talk to us at Metropolis Drugs II.

MetroDrug_logo

1201 W. 10th St.   618-524-8400
Open Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Saturday, 8:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Visit our website for lots of resources
to help keep you and your family healthy!

These studies were published in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Information on study funding sources and potential conflicts of interest was not available at the time of publication.

BEE Healthy Tip – Flu and Immunization Update

Another “Bee Healthy” tip from the trusted team at Metropolis Drugs III. From left: Tim Lawson, Dacia Stewart, Leslie Lawson and Lauren Scott

Flu and Immunization Update

Even healthy people can get very sick from influenza (flu) and can spread it to others. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that flu-related hospitalizations since 2010 have ranged from 140,000 to 710,000 annually, while flu-related deaths have ranged from 12,000 to 56,000.

During flu season, flu viruses circulate at higher levels in the U.S. population. (“Flu season” in the U.S. can begin as early as October and last as late as May.) Getting an annual flu vaccine is the best way to reduce your risk of getting sick with flu and spreading it to others. When more people get vaccinated against flu, it spreads less easily through a community.

Flu vaccines cause antibodies to develop in the body about two weeks after vaccination. These antibodies provide protection against infection with the viruses that are in the vaccine. The flu vaccine is given annually and it changes slightly from year to year. The vaccine protects against the influenza viruses that research indicates will be most common during the upcoming season. While it may not protect against all strains of influenza, it can lessen the severity of the infection by preparing the immune system for a similar strain.

Source:  U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


MetroDrug_logo

1201 W. 10th St.   618-524-8400
Open Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Saturday, 8:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

 Visit our website for lots of resources

to help keep you and your family healthy!

BEE Healthy Tip – Maintain Good Posture for a Healthy Spine

Your September Bee Healthy Tip from the trusted team at Metropolis Drugs II:  from left: Tim Lawson, Dacia Stewart, Leslie Lawson and Lauren Scott.

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Tips for Maintaining Good Posture Throughout Life

Developing healthy posture now is an important gift to give yourself. The benefits will last a lifetime!

These tips can help:

  • Keep your weight down. Excess weight exerts a constant forward pull on the back muscles and stretches and weakens abdominal muscles.
  • Avoid staying in one position for long periods. Inactivity causes muscle tension and weakness.
  • Sleep on a firm mattress and use a pillow that is just big enough to maintain the normal cervical (neck) curve. Avoid using an oversized pillow or several pillows.
  • Bend your knees when picking something up or putting it down. Carry a heavy object by using two hands and keeping the load close to your waist.
  • Wear comfortable, supportive shoes. Avoid continuous use of high-heeled or platform shoes, which throw the back’s natural curves out of alignment.
  • Walk with good posture. Keep your head erect with your chin parallel to the ground
    and allow arms to swing naturally.

Nothing herein constitutes medical advice, diagnosis or treatment, or is a substitute for professional advice.  You should always seek the advice of your physician or other medical professional if you have questions or concerns about a medical condition.

Source:

American Physical Therapy Association

 

MetroDrug_logo

1201 W. 10th St.   618-524-8400
Open Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Saturday, 8:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

 Visit our website for lots of resources

to help keep you and your family healthy!

Bee Healthy Tip: Kids and Sleep – How Much Is Enough?

Your Monthly Bee Healthy Tip from the trusted team
at Metropolis Drugs II:  from left: Tim Lawson,
Dacia Stewart, Leslie Lawson and Lauren Scott.

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Kids and Sleep: How Much Is Enough?

What happens when your kid doesn’t get enough sleep? Does he turn into Oscar the Grouch? Not a surprise, really. But moodiness isn’t the only downside of a lack of shuteye.

Sleep is critical for mental and physical development. In fact, a lack of sleep can lead to serious health problems such as high blood pressure, injuries, diabetes, and obesity in kids, as well as depression in teens (and adults) *1,2

Sleep guidelines for kids. About a year ago, the American Academy of Pediatrics came out with new sleep guidelines for kids. In case you missed it, here’s what they now recommend: Continue reading

Bee Healthy Tip – Fireworks Safety: Have fun and stay safe

Your July 2017 Bee Healthy Tip from the trusted team
at Metropolis Drugs II: from left: Tim Lawson,
Dacia Stewart, Leslie Lawson, and Lauren Scott.

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Fireworks Safety
Have Fun and Stay Safe on July 4

fireworks flagsEveryone loves July 4th fireworks! Attending a professional fireworks celebration is best. But if fireworks are legal where you live and you decide to set them off, follow these safety tips:

  • Never allow children to play with or ignite fireworks.
  • Follow warnings and instructions.
  • Be sure others are out of range before lighting fireworks.
  • Only light fireworks on a smooth, flat surface away from houses, dry leaves and flammable materials.
  • Never try to re-light fireworks that have not fully functioned.
  • Keep a bucket of water handy.

Source: U.S. Consumer

MetroDrug_logo

1201 W. 10th St.   618-524-8400
Open Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Saturdays, 8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Visit our website for lots of resources
to help keep you and your family healthy!

(Nothing herein constitutes medical advice, diagnosis or treatment, or is a substitute for professional advice. You should always seek the advice of your physician or other medical professional if you have questions or concerns about a medical condition.)

Bee Healthy Tip – Bug Bites and Stings: When to See a Doctor

Your June-2017 Bee Healthy Tip from the trusted team
at Metropolis Drugs II: from left: Tim Lawson,
Dacia Stewart, Leslie Lawson, and Lauren Scott.

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bug bites stingsBug Bites and Stings
When to see a Doctor

Most bug bites and stings aren’t serious and can be safely treated at home with topical medication, such as hydrocortisone cream or an oral antihistamine to reduce the itch. But sometimes a bug bite or sting could become serious.

bug bites stings2Go to the emergency room immediately if you experience any of the following symptoms after a sting or bite:
• Difficulty breathing.
• The sensation that your throat is closing.
• Swollen lips, tongue or face.
• Chest pain.
• A racing heartbeat lasting more than a few minutes.
• Dizziness.
• Vomiting.
• Headache.
• A red, donut-shaped rash that develops after a tick bite. This could be a sign of Lyme disease. • A fever with a red or black spotty rash that spreads. This could be a sign of Rocky Mountain spotted fever.
Source: American Academy of Dermatology

MetroDrug_logo

1201 W. 10th St.   618-524-8400
Open Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Saturdays, 8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Visit our website for lots of resources
to help keep you and your family healthy!

(Nothing herein constitutes medical advice, diagnosis or treatment, or is a substitute for professional advice. You should always seek the advice of your physician or other medical professional if you have questions or concerns about a medical condition.)