Category Archives: Bee Healthy

Bee Healthy Tip – Meditation Benefits

Your monthly Bee Healthy Tip from the trusted team
at Metropolis Drugs II: from left: Tim Lawson,
Dacia Stewart, Leslie Lawson, and Lauren Scott.

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Meditation
Benefits for Mind and Body

Meditation is a mind-and-body practice that has a long history of use for increasing calmness and physical relaxation, improving psychological balance, coping with illness, and enhancing overall health and well-being. Mind and-body practices focus on the interactions among the brain, mind, body and behavior.

There are many types of meditation, but most have four elements in common: a quiet location with as few distractions as possible; a specific, comfortable posture (sitting, lying down, walking or other positions); a focus of attention (a specially chosen word or set of words, an object, or the sensations of the breath); and an open attitude (letting distractions come and go naturally without judging them).

Some research suggests that practicing meditation may help reduce blood pressure, anxiety, depression and insomnia. Meditation is generally considered to be safe for healthy people.

Sources: National Institutes of Health; National Center for Complem

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Saturdays, 8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Visit our website for lots of resources
to help keep you and your family healthy!

(Nothing herein constitutes medical advice, diagnosis or treatment, or is a substitute for professional advice. You should always seek the advice of your physician or other medical professional if you have questions or concerns about a medical condition.)

Bee Healthy Tip: Using Antibiotics Wisely

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Tim Lawson, Dacia Stewart, Leslie Lawson and Lauren Scott.

Your monthly Bee Healthy Tip from the trusted team at Metropolis Drugs II.

Using Antibiotics Wisely:
They Fight Bacteria, Not Viruses

Antibiotics are meant to be used against bacterial infections. For example, they are used to treat strep throat, which is caused by streptococcal bacteria, and skin infections caused by staphylococcal bacteria.

Although antibiotics kill bacteria, they are not effective against viruses. Therefore, they will not be effective against viral infections such as colds, most coughs, many types of sore throat and the flu.

Using antibiotics against viral infections:
• Won’t cure the infection
• Won’t keep other individuals from catching the virus
• Won’t help a person feel better
• May cause unnecessary, harmful side effects
• May contribute to the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Patients and healthcare professionals alike can play an important role in combating antibiotic resistance. Patients should not demand antibiotics when a healthcare professional says the drugs are not needed.

Healthcare professionals should prescribe antibiotics only for infections they believe
to be caused by bacteria.

As a patient, your best approach is to ask your healthcare professional whether an
antibiotic is likely to be effective for your condition. Also, ask what else you can do to
relieve your symptoms.

Source: U.S. Food and Drug Administration

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1201 W. 10th St.   618-524-8400
Open Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Saturdays, 8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Visit our website for lots of resources
to help keep you and your family healthy!

(Nothing herein constitutes medical advice, diagnosis or treatment, or is a substitute for professional advice. You should always seek the advice of your physician or other medical professional if you have questions or concerns about a medical condition.)

Bee Healthy – Emotions and Heart Disease

wellnessLearn how your emotional health influences your heart.

In the past 40 years, cases of heart disease in the U.S. have dropped by 20 percent.(*1) Now, that’s news worth celebrating! Efforts at prevention, detection, and treatment appear to paying off. For example, Americans’ cholesterol levels keep falling. Researchers think that ditching trans fats from our diets may be one reason why. (*2)

Still, heart disease here remains the number-one cause of death in both men and women.(*2) We can do so much more to support our faithful tickers. You might be surprised to learn how much your emotional health influences your heart. Check out a few recent studies:

Pessimism. A study lasting 11 years looked at the risks linked to pessimism among 3,000 men and women. And guess what? That “glass-half-empty” attitude seemed to have a pretty big impact. Those who were most pessimistic were twice as likely to die of heart disease as the least pessimistic. The researchers can’t prove that negativity caused the rise in heart-related deaths. But this emotioncan lead to an increase in hormones related to stress and inflammation. And, that might help explain the link. (*3)

Worry. An even larger study of 7,000 Norwegians also found a link between worrying about a heart attack and actually having one. The “worried well” were twice as likely to have a heart attack as those who weren’t anxious about their health. Again, the link can’t be proven, but physical changes from anxiety are the likely culprit. (*4)

Depression. Over 10 years, researchers tracked 1,100 women and found that those with a history of depression had a much higher risk of heart disease. In fact, in women younger than 65 with no history of heart problems, depression was the only significant risk factor linked with developing heart disease. Depression can produce stress hormones. But it may it may also lead to unhealthy behaviors that can increase the risks. (*5)

Anger. Either intense anger or physical exertion doubles the odds of having a first heart attack. Even worse? Combining the two triples that risk, according to a study of 12,000 people. Chances are, anger and intense activity simply trigger an attack in people who already have artery-clogging plaques, say the researchers. Intense emotions or activity may cause a domino effect: A rise in blood pressure and heart rate constricts blood vessels. That, in turn, causes plaques to rupture and cut off blood flow to the heart. (*6)

Spotting any trends, anyone?

With medical help or even self-care such as meditation or relaxation exercises, you can learn how to shift some of these moods. If these emotions are a challenge for you, I’ll also do what I can to help. For one thing, I can point you to reliable sources of health information.  Together we can work on managing blood pressure including discussing a few changes to your diet and lifestyle.  Review the signs of a heart attack and make an appointment with your doctor today to know your overall health.

Another Helpful Health Tip from
the Trusted Team at Metropolis Drugs II

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1201 W. 10th St.   618-524-8400
Open Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Saturdays, 8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

 Visit our website for lots of resources

to help keep you and your family healthy!

Nothing herein constitutes medical advice, diagnosis or treatment, or is a substitute for professional advice.  You should always seek the advice of your physician or other medical professional if you have questions or concerns about a medical condition.

Sources:

  1. HealthDay: U.S. Heart Disease Rates Fell 20 Percent Since 1980s: Study. Available at: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162007.html
  2. HealthDay: Americans’ Cholesterol Levels Keep Falling. Available at: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162292.html
  3. HealthDay: Pessimism May Take Unwelcome Toll on the Heart. Available at: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162083.html
  4. HealthDay: Hypochondriacs May Worry Themselves Into Heart Trouble. Available at: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161838.html
  5. Women’s Brain Health Initiative: Depression Can Fuel Heart Disease in Midlife Women: Available at: http://womensbrainhealth.org/think-twice/depression-can-fuel- heart-disease- in-midlife- women 
  6. HealthDay: Anger, Heavy Exertion: Fast Track to a Heart Attack? Available at: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161395.html

Choosing Healthy Food as You Get Older

Another Helpful Health Tip from the Trusted Team at Metropolis Drugs II

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Want to improve your diet in a simple, easy-to-do way?
Check out these tips from the National Council on Aging.

Look for important nutrients. Your plate should look like a rainbow — bright, colored foods are best! A healthy meal should include lean protein (lean meats, seafood, eggs and beans); fruits and vegetables (think orange, red, green and purple); whole grains (brown rice, whole-wheat pasta); and low-fat dairy. Remember to choose foods that are high in fiber and low in sodium. Also, look for vitamin D, an important mineral as we age.

Read the Nutrition Facts label. The healthiest foods are whole foods found on the perimeter of the grocery store in the produce, meat and dairy sections. When you do eat packaged foods, read the labels to find items that are lower in fat, added sugars and sodium.

Stay hydrated. Don’t let yourself get dehydrated. Drink small amounts of fluids consistently throughout the day. Tea, coffee and water are your best choices.

Source: National Council on Aging

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1201 W. 10th St.   618-524-8400
Open Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Saturdays, 8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

 Visit our website for lots of resources

to help keep you and your family healthy!

Bee Healthy Tip – Another Great Reason to Wash Your Hands

Another Helpful Health Tip from the Trusted Team at Metropolis Drugs II

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According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, hand washing helps battle the rise in antibiotic resistance. How? Preventing sickness reduces the amount of antibiotics people take and the likelihood that antibiotic resistance will develop.

Hand washing with regular soap can prevent about 30% of diarrhea-related sicknesses and about 20% of respiratory infections (e.g., colds). Antibiotics often are prescribed unnecessarily for these health issues.

Don’t use antibacterial hand soap, though. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently recommended a ban on several chemicals found in antibacterial hand soap because they can lead to bacterial resistance. Plain old soap and water will do the trick.

— Sources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; U.S. Food and Drug Administration

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1201 W. 10th St.   618-524-8400
Open Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Saturdays, 8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

 Visit our website for lots of resources

to help keep you and your family healthy!

November Health Tips from Metropolis Drugs II

More Helpful Health Tips from the Trusted Team at Metropolis Drugs II

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Ease Holiday Stress

Feeling stressed with Thanksgiving right around the corner, followed by the December holidays Don’t abandon healthy habits these next two months. Don’t let the holidays become a free-for-all. Overindulgence only adds to your stress and guilt. Try these suggestions:

  • Have a healthy snack before holiday parties so that you don’t go overboard on sweets, appetizers or drinks.
  • Get plenty of sleep.
  • Incorporate regular physical activity into each day.
  • Take a breather. Make some time for yourself. Spending just 15 minutes alone, without distractions, may refresh you enough to handle everything you need to do. Find something that reduces stress by clearing your mind, slowing your breathing and restoring inner calm.

Avoiding Those Nasty Winter Colds

Do you really have some control over whether you catch a cold this season? Yes. There is much you can do to help protect yourself:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water. Wash them for 20 seconds, and help young children do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands. Viruses that cause colds can enter your body this way and make you sick.
  • As much as possible, stay away from people who are sick.

If you have a cold, follow these tips to help prevent spreading it to other people:

  • Stay at home while you are sick.
  • Avoid close contact with others, such as hugging, kissing or shaking hands.
  • Move away from people before coughing or sneezing.
  • Cough and sneeze into a tissue then throw it away, or cough and sneeze into your upper shirt sleeve, completely covering your mouth and nose.
  • Wash your hands after coughing, sneezing or blowing your nose.
  • Disinfect frequently touched surfaces and objects such as toys and doorknobs.

—— Sources: Mayo Clinic and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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1201 W. 10th St.   618-524-8400
Open Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Saturdays, 8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

 Visit our website for lots of resources

to help keep you and your family healthy!

October is Talk About Prescriptions Month

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Another Bee Healthy Tip from the trusted team at Metropolis Drugs II:  from left: Tim Lawson, Dacia Stewart, Leslie Lawson and Lauren Scott.


Older Adults and Medications Use

As we age, our bodies change. Medicines may affect you differently as you get older because your body processes them differently.

You may take more medicines now than when you were younger. Even medicine that you’ve taken before or have taken consistently may act differently in your body as you age. Medicines now may require more monitoring or dosage adjustments.

While medicines are an important and often necessary tool for living well as we age, there can be risks associated with using medicines, especially for older adults. Talk with your doctor and with us about your current medications, and any new medications, to make sure your prescription and over-the-counter medication use is safe and effective.

— Source: National Council on Patient Information and Education

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1201 W. 10th St.   618-524-8400
Open Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Saturdays, 8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

 Visit our website for lots of resources

to help keep you and your family healthy!