Tag Archives: Bee Healthy

Bee Healthy Tip: Kids and Sleep – How Much Is Enough?

Your Monthly Bee Healthy Tip from the trusted team
at Metropolis Drugs II:  from left: Tim Lawson,
Dacia Stewart, Leslie Lawson and Lauren Scott.

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Kids and Sleep: How Much Is Enough?

What happens when your kid doesn’t get enough sleep? Does he turn into Oscar the Grouch? Not a surprise, really. But moodiness isn’t the only downside of a lack of shuteye.

Sleep is critical for mental and physical development. In fact, a lack of sleep can lead to serious health problems such as high blood pressure, injuries, diabetes, and obesity in kids, as well as depression in teens (and adults) *1,2

Sleep guidelines for kids. About a year ago, the American Academy of Pediatrics came out with new sleep guidelines for kids. In case you missed it, here’s what they now recommend: Continue reading

Bee Healthy Tip – Bug Bites and Stings: When to See a Doctor

Your June-2017 Bee Healthy Tip from the trusted team
at Metropolis Drugs II: from left: Tim Lawson,
Dacia Stewart, Leslie Lawson, and Lauren Scott.

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bug bites stingsBug Bites and Stings
When to see a Doctor

Most bug bites and stings aren’t serious and can be safely treated at home with topical medication, such as hydrocortisone cream or an oral antihistamine to reduce the itch. But sometimes a bug bite or sting could become serious.

bug bites stings2Go to the emergency room immediately if you experience any of the following symptoms after a sting or bite:
• Difficulty breathing.
• The sensation that your throat is closing.
• Swollen lips, tongue or face.
• Chest pain.
• A racing heartbeat lasting more than a few minutes.
• Dizziness.
• Vomiting.
• Headache.
• A red, donut-shaped rash that develops after a tick bite. This could be a sign of Lyme disease. • A fever with a red or black spotty rash that spreads. This could be a sign of Rocky Mountain spotted fever.
Source: American Academy of Dermatology

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1201 W. 10th St.   618-524-8400
Open Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Saturdays, 8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Visit our website for lots of resources
to help keep you and your family healthy!

(Nothing herein constitutes medical advice, diagnosis or treatment, or is a substitute for professional advice. You should always seek the advice of your physician or other medical professional if you have questions or concerns about a medical condition.)

Bee Healthy Tip – Aging Women: Ways to Stay Healthier

Your May-2017 Bee Healthy Tip from the trusted team
at Metropolis Drugs II:  from left: Tim Lawson,
Dacia Stewart, Leslie Lawson and Lauren Scott.

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Aging Women: Ways to Stay Healthier

Like a surprise visit from your least favorite relative, aging can bring more than you’d bargained for: a few more wrinkles, a little less stamina, floppy arms, baggy kneecaps…. Sound familiar? Worse, though, are the big health changes that may accompany aging. Many of these you can’t even see. Here are some tips to point you in a healthier direction.

Where’s the fat? As it turns out, not all fat is created equal. Where you carry your fat can make a big difference, especially as you age. A recent study of women in their seventh decade of life found that being overweight or obese didn’t shorten their lives, unless the weight was carried at their waists. The risk of death was consistently higher in women with waists measuring more than 31.5 inches. However, there was an exception: Compared with white or black women, Latinas had lower death rates at any waist measurement or body mass index (BMI).*1

A second study also found that pockets of fat near the heart can be a hazard for women as estrogen levels drop after menopause. For the first time, researchers have shown a link between this type of fat and the risk of calcium build-up in the heart’s blood vessels.*2 Bottom line? As you age, healthy diet and physical exercise are more important than ever to reduce your risk of heart disease.

The new smoking: sitting. When it comes to activity, your cells apparently don’t lie. Each day, do you sit for more than 10 hours and get fewer than 40 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity? If so, your cells might be eight years older than your actual age! That’s what a recent research study found when assessing nearly 1,500 women, aged 64 to 95.*3 A second small study of 70 women also found that walking briskly at least 150 minutes a week can improve weight, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels in as little as 10 weeks.*4 Moral of the story? Enjoy that retirement, but keep moving!

Medications for older women. As you age, you’re more likely to take medication. And, in general, women are more likely to take more drugs than men. Over age 65, 9 in 10 take at least one drug a week and more than four in 10 take at least five different drugs a week. Twelve percent take 10 or more drugs per week.*5

But as you age, your body changes. It contains less water and more fat, which changes how your body processes medication. Also, your kidneys and liver may be less able to rid your body of drugs. *5

What does this all mean for you? It means taking medications over age 65 is more likely to cause side effects and drug interactions.*5 And that means that our teamwork is more important than ever. Let’s stay in touch to be sure you are on the right type and dose of medications.

Nothing herein constitutes medical advice, diagnosis or treatment, or is a substitute for professional advice.  You should always seek the advice of your physician or other medical professional if you have questions or concerns about a medical condition

MetroDrug_logo

1201 W. 10th St.   618-524-8400
Open Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Saturdays, 8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

 Visit our website for lots of resources
to help keep you and your family healthy!

Sources

Bee Healthy – Emotions and Heart Disease

wellnessLearn how your emotional health influences your heart.

In the past 40 years, cases of heart disease in the U.S. have dropped by 20 percent.(*1) Now, that’s news worth celebrating! Efforts at prevention, detection, and treatment appear to paying off. For example, Americans’ cholesterol levels keep falling. Researchers think that ditching trans fats from our diets may be one reason why. (*2)

Still, heart disease here remains the number-one cause of death in both men and women.(*2) We can do so much more to support our faithful tickers. You might be surprised to learn how much your emotional health influences your heart. Check out a few recent studies:

Pessimism. A study lasting 11 years looked at the risks linked to pessimism among 3,000 men and women. And guess what? That “glass-half-empty” attitude seemed to have a pretty big impact. Those who were most pessimistic were twice as likely to die of heart disease as the least pessimistic. The researchers can’t prove that negativity caused the rise in heart-related deaths. But this emotioncan lead to an increase in hormones related to stress and inflammation. And, that might help explain the link. (*3)

Worry. An even larger study of 7,000 Norwegians also found a link between worrying about a heart attack and actually having one. The “worried well” were twice as likely to have a heart attack as those who weren’t anxious about their health. Again, the link can’t be proven, but physical changes from anxiety are the likely culprit. (*4)

Depression. Over 10 years, researchers tracked 1,100 women and found that those with a history of depression had a much higher risk of heart disease. In fact, in women younger than 65 with no history of heart problems, depression was the only significant risk factor linked with developing heart disease. Depression can produce stress hormones. But it may it may also lead to unhealthy behaviors that can increase the risks. (*5)

Anger. Either intense anger or physical exertion doubles the odds of having a first heart attack. Even worse? Combining the two triples that risk, according to a study of 12,000 people. Chances are, anger and intense activity simply trigger an attack in people who already have artery-clogging plaques, say the researchers. Intense emotions or activity may cause a domino effect: A rise in blood pressure and heart rate constricts blood vessels. That, in turn, causes plaques to rupture and cut off blood flow to the heart. (*6)

Spotting any trends, anyone?

With medical help or even self-care such as meditation or relaxation exercises, you can learn how to shift some of these moods. If these emotions are a challenge for you, I’ll also do what I can to help. For one thing, I can point you to reliable sources of health information.  Together we can work on managing blood pressure including discussing a few changes to your diet and lifestyle.  Review the signs of a heart attack and make an appointment with your doctor today to know your overall health.

Another Helpful Health Tip from
the Trusted Team at Metropolis Drugs II

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1201 W. 10th St.   618-524-8400
Open Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Saturdays, 8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

 Visit our website for lots of resources

to help keep you and your family healthy!

Nothing herein constitutes medical advice, diagnosis or treatment, or is a substitute for professional advice.  You should always seek the advice of your physician or other medical professional if you have questions or concerns about a medical condition.

Sources:

  1. HealthDay: U.S. Heart Disease Rates Fell 20 Percent Since 1980s: Study. Available at: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162007.html
  2. HealthDay: Americans’ Cholesterol Levels Keep Falling. Available at: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162292.html
  3. HealthDay: Pessimism May Take Unwelcome Toll on the Heart. Available at: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162083.html
  4. HealthDay: Hypochondriacs May Worry Themselves Into Heart Trouble. Available at: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161838.html
  5. Women’s Brain Health Initiative: Depression Can Fuel Heart Disease in Midlife Women: Available at: http://womensbrainhealth.org/think-twice/depression-can-fuel- heart-disease- in-midlife- women 
  6. HealthDay: Anger, Heavy Exertion: Fast Track to a Heart Attack? Available at: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161395.html

November Health Tips from Metropolis Drugs II

More Helpful Health Tips from the Trusted Team at Metropolis Drugs II

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Ease Holiday Stress

Feeling stressed with Thanksgiving right around the corner, followed by the December holidays Don’t abandon healthy habits these next two months. Don’t let the holidays become a free-for-all. Overindulgence only adds to your stress and guilt. Try these suggestions:

  • Have a healthy snack before holiday parties so that you don’t go overboard on sweets, appetizers or drinks.
  • Get plenty of sleep.
  • Incorporate regular physical activity into each day.
  • Take a breather. Make some time for yourself. Spending just 15 minutes alone, without distractions, may refresh you enough to handle everything you need to do. Find something that reduces stress by clearing your mind, slowing your breathing and restoring inner calm.

Avoiding Those Nasty Winter Colds

Do you really have some control over whether you catch a cold this season? Yes. There is much you can do to help protect yourself:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water. Wash them for 20 seconds, and help young children do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands. Viruses that cause colds can enter your body this way and make you sick.
  • As much as possible, stay away from people who are sick.

If you have a cold, follow these tips to help prevent spreading it to other people:

  • Stay at home while you are sick.
  • Avoid close contact with others, such as hugging, kissing or shaking hands.
  • Move away from people before coughing or sneezing.
  • Cough and sneeze into a tissue then throw it away, or cough and sneeze into your upper shirt sleeve, completely covering your mouth and nose.
  • Wash your hands after coughing, sneezing or blowing your nose.
  • Disinfect frequently touched surfaces and objects such as toys and doorknobs.

—— Sources: Mayo Clinic and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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1201 W. 10th St.   618-524-8400
Open Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Saturdays, 8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

 Visit our website for lots of resources

to help keep you and your family healthy!

BEE Healthy: Preventing Falls as you Grow Older

Your April Bee Healthy Tip from the trusted team at
Metropolis Drugs II:  from left: Tim Lawson,
Dacia Stewart, Leslie Lawson and Lauren Scott.

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Preventing Falls as You Grow Older

Whether it simply bruises your ego or breaks a bone, taking a fall is no fun. Each year, one in three seniors 65 and older experiences a fall—a number that has grown in recent years. For people in this age group, falling is the leading cause of injury and injury-related deaths.

Whether due to concerns about independence or worrying others, however, fewer than half these people tell the doctor about their falls. But that could add insult to injury because one fall may lead to another.

Don’t keep it a secret. Be upfront with your doctor—and with me. Provide details about when, where, and how you fell. We can help you pinpoint the problem and suggest changes you can make. For starters, falling might be due to:

  • A chronic health condition
  • An infection
  • A balance disorder
  • Vision problems
  • Muscle weakness
  • Medications

Stay healthy. Fortunately, falls needn’t be a fait accompli. Even simple lifestyle changes can make a difference in preventing falls. This includes maintaining good physical condition with exercise, sleep, and nutrition.  Also, stay well hydrated with plenty of water. And limit alcohol, which can slow your reflexes and throw you off balance.  Wear properly fitting, sturdy shoes with nonskid soles and toss out the floppy slippers and shoes with slick soles.

With your doctor’s permission, engage in exercise that improves strength, flexibility, balance, and gait. This might include walking, water workouts, or tai chi—a gentle exercise that involves meditative movements. Is a fear of falling keeping you stuck in your easy chair? Your doctor may suggest physical therapy or a guided exercise program.

Review your meds. Here’s where I can really help. Make a list of your medications. Do any make you dizzy or drowsy? Your doctor and I can review this list with you, discuss any side effects you are having, and decide whether it makes sense to change your medications.  Of course, don’t make any changes without first having a conversation with your doctor.

Make changes on the home front. Here are a few more ways to help prevent falls at home:

  • Clean up spills right away.
  • Remove throw rugs.
  • Clear newspapers and electrical or phone cords from walkways.
  • Use nonslip mats in the bathtub and shower.
  • Put nightlights in hallways, bedrooms, and bathroom.
  • Keep flashlights in easy-to-reach places.
  • Turn on lights before going up or down stairs.
  • Install handrails on both sides of stairways.

Has your doctor suggested an assistive device such as a cane or walker—but your pride won’t quite allow it? It may help to focus on how this can keep you more independent. Other assistive devices can also help prevent falls. They include:

  • A raised toilet seat with armrests
  • Shower or tub grab bars
  • A shower seat and hand-held shower nozzle

Remember to check our store for supplies to safe-proof your home. I can help point you in the right direction.

Nothing herein constitutes medical advice, diagnosis or treatment, or is a substitute for professional advice.  You should always seek the advice of your physician or other medical professional if you have questions or concerns about a medical condition.

MetroDrug_logo

1201 W. 10th St.   618-524-8400
Open Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Saturdays, 8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Visit our website for lots of resources
to help keep you and your family healthy!

(Nothing herein constitutes medical advice, diagnosis or treatment, or is a substitute for professional advice. You should always seek the advice of your physician or other medical professional if you have questions or concerns about a medical condition.)


 

Sources

  1. HealthDay: “Falls on the Rise Among U.S. Seniors.” Available at: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_150490.html Accessed February 16, 2015.
  2. NIHSeniorHealth: “Balance Problems.” Available at: http://nihseniorhealth.gov/balanceproblems/aboutbalanceproblems/01.html Accessed February 16, 2015.
  3. HealthDay: “Seniors May Keep Falls a Secret.” Available at: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_150626.html Accessed February 16, 2015.
  4. Mayo Clinic: “Healthy Aging.” Available at: http://www.mayoclinic.org/fall-prevention/ART-20047358?p=1 Accessed February 16, 2015.
  5. NIHMedlinePlus: “How Can Older Adults Prevent Falls?” Available at:http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/magazine/issues/winter14/articles/winter14pg15.htmlAccessed February 16, 2015.
  6. NIHMedlinePlus: “Home Improvements Prevent Falls.” Available at: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/magazine/issues/winter14/articles/winter14pg16-17.html Accessed February 16, 2015.